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Press and Public Relations

We are pleased that you wish to learn more about the work of the Tourismus Marketing Gesellschaft Sachsen. Here you have access to current and previous press releases on tourism in Saxony. For further questions and information the Press Officer Ines Nebelung will be at your disposal.

Press and public relations

Moritzburg Festival

2019 Saxony travel news: Where arts and culture have the wow effect

2019 Saxony travel news:
Where arts and culture have the wow effect
Saxony in Germany’s southeast is the place to be for discerning travellers, offering arts and culture of international standing. Not only musicians, painters and master builders, but also nature itself have created great works of art here. Each year, approximately 9.7 million German and international guests decide to spend their holidays in Saxony. Adding day trippers, this number rises to more than 30 million.

The joy of Saxon towns and cities
Saxony’s charm is manifold and not last the region’s towns and cities are a delight, full of splendid architecture, fascinating history and joy of life. Today’s visitors can create their very own personal experiences in places that are steeped in history, be it Dresden, Leipzig and Chemnitz or smaller towns such as Meißen, Pirna or Plauen. All of them offer a wealth of cultural treasures. Annaberg-Buchholz, Bautzen and Freiberg are perfect for leisurely strolls. Görlitz, Zittau or Zwickau feature romantic cobblestone lanes and bustling market squares. Grimma, Kamenz, Radebeul and Torgau offer fascinating insights into Saxony’s cultural history. Exploring the region’s beautiful towns and cities is not only inspiring, it also highlights what makes Saxony not only such a unique destination with 1,000 years of cultural history but also the number 1 cultural destination for German and international guests alike. Tip: Saxony’s towns and cities are particularly charming during the festive season, offering a unique wealth of traditional Christmas events and special occasions.

Best in class music
Cultural highlights in Saxony include the many top musical events that can be visited and enjoyed in the region. In 2019, Leipzig celebrates the 200th anniversary of Clara Schumann, with the annual Schumann Festival Week (12 to 29 Sep 2019) putting the remarkable compositions and piano concerts of the famous pianist centre stage. Other classical music favourites are Bach Festival Leipzig (14 to 23 June 2019), Dresden Music Festival (16 May to 15 June 2019) and Moritzburg Festival (10 to 25 Aug 2019). Lovers of jazz and Dixieland tunes should put the Dixieland Festival in Dresden on their agenda (12 to 19 May 2019) and maybe even combine it with Görlitz Jazz Days a few days later (22 to 26 May 2019).

Explore Saxony on the art trail
Anyone exploring Saxony on the art trail will soon realise how incredibly varied Saxony’s history of art is. From anonymous Gothic masters to the New Leipzig School of contemporary time and including the Cranach family of painters, Canaletto, Caspar David Friedrich, Ludwig Richter, Max Klinger, Otto Dix and Oskar Kokoschka, A.R. Penck and not last Georg Baselitz and contemporary art star Gerhard Richter – the history of art in Saxony is not short of big names and internationally renowned artists who have lived, worked and left their traces in this region. “The Allure of Art – History, Museums, Workplaces”, a new, free brochure, curates everything worth knowing about Saxony’s unique art scene in one place. Perfect for an overview of 800 years of art in Saxony as well as the most important museums, galleries, innovative arts spaces and art schools.

2019 reopenings
“The Chocolate Girl”, one of this year’s art highlights focusing on one of the most famous paintings of Dresden’s Old Masters Gallery, is still on until 6 January 2019 in the Zwinger. After comprehensive renovation, the Old Masters Gallery and Sculpture Collection are set to reopen in December next year. Another reopening scheduled for 2019 is the west wing of the “Residenzschloss”, Dresden’s Royal palace and former residence of the House of Wettin. Five of the ceremonial halls and historical rooms, dating back to the 16th century and destroyed in 1945, are being restored to their original state and due to reopen next year on the occasion of the 300th anniversary of their inauguration and wedding of Frederick August, Elector of Saxony, and Archduchess Maria Josepha of Austria. The splendid spaces will feature many original items and include, among others, two antechambers and a bedroom with a huge imperial bed. Last but not least, Fortress Dresden, currently closed for renovation, will also reopen in 2019 with the multimedia exhibition “Splendour. Tears. Disaster. Closer Than Ever”, providing insights into the world of Germany’s oldest fortress.

If yet another special occasion for a trip to Saxony is needed, 2019 will also see the 30th anniversary of the fall of the Wall, including what promises to be a very emotional “Festival of Lights” in Leipzig on 9 October 2019. All event highlights in Saxony’s cities and regions are listed in the “Cultural Highlights in Saxony 2018-2019” brochure.

The Bauhaus turns 100: Saxony’s icons of Classic Modernism
In 2019, the Bauhaus art and design school celebrates the 100th anniversary of its establishment. A lot of the groundwork for this eminent movement was laid in Saxony where renowned architects of the so-called “Neues Bauen” (New Building) style left their mark. Germany’s first garden city “Hellerau” in the northern part of Dresden was rooted in the “Deutsche Werkstätten für Handwerkskunst“ (German Workshops for Craftmanship) who were also co-founders of “Deutscher Werkbund” (German Association of Craftsmen) that is closely related to the Bauhaus movement.

Architecture and design lovers will also find numerous icons of Classic Modernism throughout the region, such as Josef Albers’ glass window in Leipzig’s Grassi Museum, the “Versöhnungskirche” (Church of Reconciliation) in Leipzig and the Schocken department store in Chemnitz, which today houses a museum for archaeology. “Haus Schminke” in Löbau is one of four global eminent examples of the “Neues Bauen” style of avantgarde architecture that originated in Germany in the 1920s. In preparation of next year’s 100th Bauhaus anniversary, the house has been completely renovated.

Saxony offers many more special events and exhibitions for design afficionados, such as the “Bauhaus Saxony” exhibition at Leipzig’s Grassi Museum (19 April to 6 Oct 2019). Also in Leipzig, the Museum of the Printing Arts hosts a special exhibition (30 June to 27 Oct 2019), highlighting the art of printing in 1919 and looking at how innovative German graphic arts influenced the Bauhaus. To see the most widely performed avantgarde artistic dance, head to Dresden where Oskar Schlemmer’s “Das Triadische Ballett” (Triadic Ballet) will be performed on 7 and 8 June 2019 during Dresden Music Festival. Dresden City Museum is taking a look at Modernist architecture in its “Modernism in Dresden? Architecture and Urban Planning 1919 – 1939” exhibition (22 June to 6 Oct 2019). Chemnitz’s Industrial Museum is planning a special exhibition (5 Oct 2019 to 27 Jan 2020) on the occasion of the Marianne Brandt Competition to show 60 works of young artists.
On the occasion of the 100th Bauhaus jubilee, the competition, which is the only one in Germany dedicated to a female Bauhaus representative, will completely focus on the complex artistic and design work of Marianne Brandt. The painter, sculptor, photographer and designer studied at the Bauhaus school and in 1928 became head of the metal workshop.

Saxony’s industrial heritage
Saxony also has a long history of industry and manufacturing which today provides fascinating experiences and insights for travellers. The heyday of Saxony as an industrial powerhouse in Germany has left numerous sights and attractions that can be toured on the “Route of Industrial Culture in Saxony” with altogether 51 stops. The former Audi factory in Zwickau, today the August-Horch-Museum, is a special highlight. The museum which opened a modern extension in 2017 has a splendid collection of historic cars from the beginning of the 20th century. In 1904, Saxony became a centre for car manufacturing in Germany when August Horch started producing cars in Zwickau in a venture that eventually became today’s car giant Audi. The museum will also be one of the sites of the “4. Sächsische Landesausstellung“. This regional exhibition is organised every few years, focusing on different themes, and from April to November 2020 will highlight Saxony’s industrial heritage.

Easy travel planning
To plan your Saxony itinerary, the “Sales Guide Saxony” provides all necessary details on towns, cities and different regions as well as information on tourism service providers, such as hotels and restaurants for groups, palaces and castles, industrial heritage sites, museums, meeting and event venues, as well as suggestions for themed routes. The brochure also informs about typical regional food and provides shopping tips. Tourism professionals will also find a handy list of 2018 and 2019 events and festivals as well as contacts for incoming agencies and services provided by Tourismus Marketing Gesellschaft Sachsen.

About Tourismus Marketing Gesellschaft Sachsen mbH
Tourismus Marketing Gesellschaft Sachsen mbH has been marketing Saxony as an attractive travel destination in Germany and abroad since 2000. Using the slogan “Saxony. State of the Arts”, it positions the region as a top cultural destination, focusing on arts, culture and city breaks as well as family, wellness and active holiday. Corresponding holiday packages can be booked via reservation systems and tour operators. Saxony’s main source markets are Germany, the Netherlands, Switzerland, Austria, USA, UK, Poland and Italy.
Contact: Tourismus Marketing Gesellschaft Sachsen mbH, Bautzner Str. 45-47, D-01099 Dresden, Phone.: +49 351 491 700, Fax: +49 351 496 9306, infoge-@sachsen-tour-schützt.de, www.visitsaxony.com, www.facebook.com/visitsaxony; www.instagram.com/visitsaxony

Bauhaus

2019 Bauhaus centenary: New discoveries, special exhibitions and even ballet

With London’s Tate Modern currently delighting visitors with a retrospective of Bauhaus pioneer Anni Albers’ groundbreaking textile art, we are taking a look ahead at things not to be missed next year in Saxony.

Visitors can add an interesting dimension by exploring neighbouring Saxony on the Bauhaus trail as a lot of the groundwork for the eminent design school was laid there. We have curated some of the most interesting Bauhaus experiences here:

Saxony and its icons of Classic Modernism

A lot of the groundwork for the Bauhaus movement was laid in Saxony where renowned architects of the so-called “Neues Bauen” (New Building) style left their mark. Germany’s first garden city “Hellerau” (1909) in the northern part of Dresden was rooted in the “Deutsche Werkstätten für Handwerkskunst“ (German Workshops for Craftmanship) who were also co-founders of “Deutscher Werkbund” (German Association of Craftsmen) that is closely related to the Bauhaus movement.

Architecture and design lovers will also find numerous icons of Classic Modernism throughout the region, such as Josef Albers’ large-scale glass window in Leipzig’s Grassi Museum, the “Versöhnungskirche” (Church of Reconciliation) in Leipzig and the Schocken department store in Chemnitz, which today houses a museum for archaeology. “Haus Schminke” in Löbau is one of four global eminent examples of the “Neues Bauen” style of avantgarde architecture that originated in Germany in the 1920s. In preparation of next year’s 100th Bauhaus anniversary, the house has been completely renovated and will be open to the public.

Another hidden gem can be found in the small town of Niesky not too far from the Polish border where architect Konrad Wachsmann, a friend of Bauhaus founder Walter Gropius, built a modernist wood house in block design, now known as “Konrad-Wachsmann-Haus” and open to visitors.

Exhibitions in Dresden, Leipzig and beyond

The region also offers a number of special events and exhibitions for next year’s centenary such as the “Bauhaus Saxony” exhibition at Leipzig’s Grassi Museum (19 April to 6 Oct 2019). Also in Leipzig, the Museum of the Printing Arts hosts a special exhibition (30 June to 27 Oct 2019), highlighting the art of printing in 1919 and looking at how innovative German graphic arts influenced the Bauhaus. To see the most widely performed avantgarde artistic dance, head to Dresden where Oskar Schlemmer’s “Das Triadische Ballett” (Triadic Ballet) is on the agenda of Dresden Music Festival to be performed on 7 and 8 June 2019.

Dresden City Museum is taking a look at Modernist architecture in its “Modernism in Dresden? Architecture and Urban Planning 1919 – 1939” exhibition (22 June to 6 Oct 2019).
Chemnitz’s Industrial Museum is planning a special exhibition (5 Oct 2019 to 27 Jan 2020) on the occasion of the Marianne Brandt Competition to showcase 60 works of young artists. The painter, sculptor, photographer and designer, who studied at the Bauhaus school, became head of the metal workshop in 1928 and the competition is the only one in Germany dedicated to a female Bauhaus representative.

ENDS

Note to the Editor

Travel information:
Easy access to Saxony: All major airlines to Berlin and Ryanair to Leipzig New: ICE high-speed rail link cutting travel times from Munich and Nuremberg – Munich-Erfurt 2 hrs 15 min, Nuremberg-Erfurt 1 hr, Munich-Leipzig 3 hrs 15 min, Nuremberg-Leipzig 2 hrs

About Tourismus Marketing Gesellschaft Sachsen mbH
Tourismus Marketing Gesellschaft Sachsen mbH has been marketing Saxony as an attractive travel destination in Germany and abroad since 2000. Using the slogan “Saxony. State of the Arts”, it positions the region as a top cultural destination, focusing on arts, culture and city breaks as well as family, wellness and active holiday. Corresponding holiday packages can be booked via reservation systems and tour operators. Saxony’s main source markets are Germany, the Netherlands, Switzerland, Austria, USA, UK, Poland and Italy.
Contact: Tourismus Marketing Gesellschaft Sachsen mbH, Bautzner Str. 45-47, D-01099 Dresden, Phone.: +49 351 491 700, Fax: +49 351 496 9306, infoge-@sachsen-tour-schützt.de, www.visitsaxony.com, www.facebook.com/visitsaxony; www.instagram.com/visitsaxony

Miners parade Seiffen

Immersive Christmas experiences in Saxony

From palaces and castles to wine-growing estates, a park and of course romantic towns and bustling cities – Christmas markets in Saxony go way beyond the usual setting and even better; the festive spirit runs well into the New Year, offering visitors the chance for a more relaxed, post-Christmas mug of Glühwein.

Saxony surprises: of old Christmas favourites & new kids on the block

We cannot talk about Christmas without mentioning Germany’s oldest Christmas market in Dresden (28 Nov to 24 Dec 2018): The so-called Striezelmarkt in the heart of the city’s Baroque centre is a sight for the eyes and delight for the senses. Time your visit to coincide with the Stollen festival on the second Advent weekend (8/9 December 2018) where a giant version of this special Christmas cake that was invented in Dresden is paraded through the streets. For a more intimate experience, check out the medieval Christmas market in Dresden’s Stallhof with 50 stalls in a charming courtyard. The “back to the roots” market does without singing and illluminations and instead has craftsmen, such as potters, leather workers or carvers, demonstrating their skills. It is on until 6 January so you can enjoy your mulled wine even after Christmas in a more relaxed mood. Over in nearby Leipzig the Christmas market (27 Nov to 23 Dec 2018) on and around the market square not only features a giant spruce tree but also a special Scandinavian section where visitors can sample a selection of Scandi delicacies, from roasted salmon to Glögi mulled wine.

Among the many delightful smaller Christmas markets in Saxony’s historic towns, Seiffen is a particular highlight. The town in the Ore Mountains is at the centre of the region’s famous wooden toy and Christmas decoration industry which goes back to the 17th century when impoverished miners turned to toy making. Wooden candle arches, pyramids, nutcrackers and candlesticks can be bought here directly from the makers. During Advent, Seiffen turns into a veritable Christmas town including a picture-perfect market (30 Nov to 23 Dec 2018) and some unique Christmas traditions, such as the Miners’ Parade on 15 December. These spectacular parades take place throughout the Ore Mountains in former mining strongholds, including Freiberg and Annaberg.

For something a bit different, try the new Christmas Garden Pillnitz (14 Nov 2018 to 6 Jan 2019), taking place for the first time this year on the grounds of Schloss & Park Pillnitz outside Dresden. On a 1.25-mile walk, the park is transformed into a fairy tale inspired landscape with light effects and special architectural features for visitors to enjoy an immersive experience full of light and sparkle. For more winter fairy tale moments, try the market at Königstein Fortress south of Dresden where an illuminated fairy tale path takes centre stage alongside traditional crafts, Saxon folk art and Christmas carol singing (1/2, 8/9, 15/16 & 22/23 Dec 2018). Heading north towards Meissen, the delightful Schloss Proschwitz, also Saxony’s oldest privately run wine-growing estate, hosts the Proschwitzer Weihnacht (29 Nov to 2 Dec 2018) market where the vineyard’s wines can be tasted in a suitable Christmassy atmosphere.

ENDS

Note to the Editor
- For more information on Christmas markets in Saxony, see here
- For more information on palaces and castles hosting Christmas markets in Saxony, see here
- Updated version of the “Christmas Wonderland Saxony” app by Saxony Tourism, with information about over 50 Christmas markets, selected seasonal events and specific Saxon Christmas traditions, from mid-October on Google’s play store and the App store

Travel information:
Easy access to Saxony: All major airlines to Berlin and Ryanair to Leipzig
New: ICE high-speed rail link cutting travel times from Munich and Nuremberg – Munich-Erfurt 2 hrs 15 min, Nuremberg-Erfurt 1 hr, Munich-Leipzig 3 hrs 15 min, Nuremberg-Leipzig 2 hrs

About Tourismus Marketing Gesellschaft Sachsen mbH
Tourismus Marketing Gesellschaft Sachsen mbH has been marketing Saxony as an attractive travel destination in Germany and abroad since 2000. Using the slogan “Saxony. State of the Arts”, it positions the region as a top cultural destination, focusing on arts, culture and city breaks as well as family, wellness and active holiday. Corresponding holiday packages can be booked via reservation systems and tour operators. Saxony’s main source markets are Germany, the Netherlands, Switzerland, Austria, USA, UK, Poland and Italy.
Contact: Tourismus Marketing Gesellschaft Sachsen mbH, Bautzner Str. 45-47, D-01099 Dresden, Phone.: +49 351 491 700, Fax: +49 351 496 9306, infoge-@sachsen-tour-schützt.de, www.visitsaxony.com, www.facebook.com/visitsaxony; www.instagram.com/visitsaxony

Radebeul Wackerbarth Castle Wine Festivity

Europe’s hidden wine region: Explore Saxony on the wine trail

Steep wine terraces, a very special grape variety and winegrowing going back to the 11th century – Saxony’s wine route is a treat not just for wine lovers, with enchanting scenery and great festivities over the coming months.

On 55 km, the Saxon Wine Route runs from Pirna via Dresden and Meissen up to Diesbar-Seusslitz through Germany’s easternmost wine-growing regions and one of its smallest. Which makes it perfect for leisurely explorations, taking in the Elbe valley scenery and its unique combination of stately architecture and winegrowing with palaces, mansions, old vintner’s houses and vine taverns. The main regional varieties are Pinot Blanc, Pinot Gris, Traminer as well as the very rare Goldriesling which is almost exclusively cultivated in Saxony.

Get a taste of Saxony’s best: from sparkling to organic wines

Schloss Wackerbarth, the region’s most famous vineyard, is one of the places to sample the special aroma of the Goldriesling variety that was introduced to Saxony from the Alsace in 1913. Wackerbarth, sitting above the Elbe not far from Dresden, is a quite splendid combination of vineyards, Baroque gardens, a palace and a modern wine and sparkling wine factory. In other words, don’t miss!

Another name to remember is Hoflössnitz in Radebeul, a listed estate and jewel in Saxony’s winegrowing crown. Once a hunting lodge and with a history going back to the 15th century, the historic ensemble features a gorgeous ballroom with vineyard views as well as a wine museum and a “Saxon Wine Route” visitor information centre. Hoflössnitz vineyard, which only produces organic wines, also offers onsite accommodation with four double rooms and two apartments.

Schloss Proschwitz is Saxony’s oldest vineyard and also the largest privately-owned one. Run by Georg Prince of Lippe who step by step bought back his family’s estate after the fall of the Wall, Schloss Proschwitz was built in the early 18th century. Its location above the Elbe is hard to beat, with splendid views of Meissen and a great wine shop to sample top quality wines. Speaking of which, Saxony’s wines are best tried at one of the following wine festivals and wine-themed events:

25 & 26 August: Open Vineyards Weekend

A long-standing favourite with the locals for a reason: Every year, vineyards between Pillnitz and Diesbar-Seusslitz, in Dresden and the small town of Freital just a few miles south open their doors to visitors who can explore the wine terraces and winemaking on guided tours, before sampling the products. A great way to get to know what makes the Saxon Wine Route so special.

15 & 16 September: Federweisser in Diesbar-Seusslitz

Picturesque Diesbar-Seusslitz in the Dresden Elbland region is the gateway to the Saxon Wine Route. Early autumn is the time for Federweisser, the sweet and low-alcohol wine made of grapes that ripen early, and Diesbar-Seusslitz has quite rightly dedicated a whole wine festival to it.
There’s music, guided tours of the surrounding vineyards and lots of delicious savoury snacks that go particularly well with this wine. Don’t be put off by its cloudy look that is down to the yeast that is added to the grapes and its sweetness – it is actually rather refreshing, with a pleasant sparkle. Tip: Take a look at the local Baroque palace and its lovely gardens.

28 to 30 September: Wine Festival in Meissen

Walks in Meissen’s vineyards are a delight in autumn but there is another reason why you should make it here in late September: The town’s Wine Festival is the biggest fair of the Elbland region with all the major Saxon vineyards showcasing their wines. For three days, Meissen’s beautiful old town is all about wine, music and food. Not to be missed: The residents open their courtyards and vaulted cellars to visitors, turning private homes into very charming vine taverns.

28 to 30 September: Autumn and Wine Festival in Radebeul

Competing with Meissen on the same weekend (but no worries, you can easily fit in both!), Radebeul, about 25 minutes further south, combines wine and performances to great effect: Apart from 30 stands run by winemakers from Saxony and the nearby Saale-Unstrut winegrowing region, wine lovers are treated to anything from pantomime to dance and puppet theatre. Various stages in courtyards and on squares invite visitors to enjoy international artists and vote for their favourite performance.

ENDS

Travel information:

Easy access to Saxony: All major airlines to Berlin and Ryanair to Leipzig
New: ICE high-speed rail link cutting travel times from Munich and Nuremberg – Munich-Erfurt 2 hrs 15 min, Nuremberg-Erfurt 1 hr, Munich-Leipzig 3 hrs 15 min, Nuremberg-Leipzig 2 hrs

General information

About Tourismus Marketing Gesellschaft Sachsen mbH


Tourismus Marketing Gesellschaft Sachsen mbH has been marketing Saxony as an attractive travel destination in Germany and abroad since 2000. Using the slogan “Saxony. State of the Arts”, it positions the region as a top cultural destination, focusing on arts, culture and city breaks as well as family, wellness and active holiday. Corresponding holiday packages can be booked via reservation systems and tour operators. Saxony’s main source markets are Germany, the Netherlands, Switzerland, Austria, USA, UK, Poland and Italy.
Contact: Tourismus Marketing Gesellschaft Sachsen mbH, Bautzner Str. 45-47, D-01099 Dresden, Phone.: +49 351 491 700, Fax: +49 351 496 9306, infoge-@sachsen-tour-schützt.de, www.visitsaxony.com, www.facebook.com/visitsaxony; www.instagram.com/visitsaxony

Gemäldegalerie Alte Meister – Palazzo dello Zwinger, Dresda

Exploring Saxony on the art trail

World-class museums, galleries, innovative arts spaces and art schools – Saxony has it all. “The Allure of Art – History, Museums, Workplaces”, a new, free brochure, for the first time collects everything worth knowing about the region’s unique art scene in one place.

The brochure, published by the Tourism Board of Saxony, is a handy tool for discerning travellers, navigating them through the astounding wealth of museums, galleries and art spaces – including many outside the major cities Dresden and Leipzig – and enabling them to design their very own art trip. From anonymous Gothic masters to the New Leipzig School of contemporary times and including the Cranach family of painters, Canaletto, Caspar David Friedrich, the artists of the “Brücke” group, Otto Dix, Oskar Kokoschka or Georg Baselitz – the history of art in Saxony is not short of big names and internationally renowned artists who’ve lived, worked and left their traces in this region:

Dresden’s splendid State Art Collections & beyond

Dresden’s art institutions are characterised by the former royal treasures of the Dresden State Art Collections, displayed in altogether 15 museums, including the Old Masters Gallery with paintings by Vermeer, Rembrandt, Rubens or Titian, and New Masters Gallery, dedicated to works from 1800 to the present day. Apart from these visitor favourites, there’s lots more to explore, such as the hidden masterpieces of one of the world’s oldest and most important collections of works of art on paper in the Dresden Collection of Prints, Drawings and Photographs. Or try the Leonhardi Museum, founded by Eduard Leonhardi, known as the “painter of the German forest” and a student of Dresden-born Ludwig Richter who was one of Germany’s most beloved artists in the 19th century. Apart from Leonhardi’s work, the picturesque property is now also the place to go for selected German contemporary art with a focus on regional traditions.

Leipzig’s rich patrons and young art

Over in Leipzig, it was not the aristocracy but the city’s bourgeoisie who shaped and supported the local art scene: In 1837, a merchant and a publisher founded the municipal art association and 20 years later, the splendid Museum of Fine Arts was opened, which is now housed in a new, modern building. Come here for, among others, an impressive collection of works by the New Leipzig School artists, such as Neo Rauch, Michael Triegel or Rosa Loy. For an array of 1,500 objects by over 300 contemporary artists head to the “Galerie für Zeitgenössische Kunst” in the impressive former villa of a Leipzig newspaper publisher. G2 Kunsthalle is another exciting place for contemporary art: Since its foundation in 2015, parts of the private collection of the Leipzig entrepreneur Steffen Hildebrand have been on show here. It focuses on young contemporary art after the turn of the millennium, including many local artists. Tip: The glass lounge offers great views of Leipzig’s city centre!

Of course, no account of Leipzig as a major contemporary arts hub in Germany is complete without mentioning the “Spinnerei”, the place where it all started in the early noughties when artists, including Neo Rauch, set up shop here, turning the once largest European cotton mill in one of the most interesting contemporary art production and exhibition venues.
More than 110 artists’ studios, eleven galleries plus workshops, architectural and design studios as well as an international dance and choreography centre and printing houses have created a unique beehive of creativity in the surroundings of the old red-brick industrial buildings. The national and international galleries on site draw large audiences to their exhibitions and the popular open-house weekends three times a year including special visitor tours have become highlights in Leipzig’s event calendar.

Hidden treasures in unexpected places

Outside Saxony’s main urban centres, art lovers venturing off the beaten track are more than rewarded with world-class venues in towns such as Bautzen, Chemnitz, Görlitz or Zwickau. In particular Chemnitz, one hour in the south-west of Dresden, impresses with four excellent museums, including the Art Collections with 70,000 objects ranging from the 16th to the 21st century, including almost 500 works by the “Brücke” painter and Chemnitz-born artist Karl Schmidt Rottluff. Museum Gunzenhauser is another gem: Opened in 2007 in a converted former bank built in the New Objectivity style in 1930, it houses a large part of the private collection of the gallery owner Dr Alfred Gunzenhauser with 2,400 works by artists of Classical Modernism and from the second half of the 20th century. This includes nearly 400 (!) works by Otto Dix, one of the world’s largest collections by this artist.

Be inspired for your very own Saxony art trip and order “The Allure of Art – History, Museums, Workplaces” brochure free of charge online, www.visitsaxony.com, or by mail, infoge-@sachsen-tour-schützt.de.

ENDS

Notes to the editor

Travel information:
Easy access to Saxony: All major airlines to Berlin and Ryanair to Leipzig
New: ICE high-speed rail link cutting travel times from Munich and Nuremberg – Munich-Erfurt 2 hrs 15 min, Nuremberg-Erfurt 1 hr, Munich-Leipzig 3 hrs 15 min, Nuremberg-Leipzig 2 hrs

General information

About Tourismus Marketing Gesellschaft Sachsen mbH

Tourismus Marketing Gesellschaft Sachsen mbH has been marketing Saxony as an attractive travel destination in Germany and abroad since 2000. Using the slogan “Saxony. State of the Arts”, it positions the region as a top cultural destination, focusing on arts, culture and city breaks as well as family, wellness and active holiday. Corresponding holiday packages can be booked via reservation systems and tour operators. Saxony’s main source markets are Germany, the Netherlands, Switzerland, Austria, USA, UK, Poland and Italy.
Contact: Tourismus Marketing Gesellschaft Sachsen mbH, Bautzner Str. 45-47, D-01099 Dresden, Phone.: +49 351 491 700, Fax: +49 351 496 9306, infoge-@sachsen-tour-schützt.de,
www.visitsaxony.com
https://www.facebook.com/SaxonyTourism/
www.instagram.com/visitsaxony